Encyclopedia Muranica: It’s Not U, It’s Mii

I feel as if I’ve done adequate job in detailing some of the more stand out additions and adulation’s of the Wii U launch. One element of surprise yet with standing my mention is actually not about U at all.

It’s about Mii.

The inventor of the it’s not you it’s me thing.

The inventor of the it’s not you it’s me thing.

More specifically, the Omni-presence of the Miiverse, Nintendo’s attempt at a foray into the social side of gaming. While the Wii had “options” as far as reaching out to others, what existed compared to the 360 and PS3 was akin to a carrier pigeon trying to outperform a telephone.

Bloodied feathers everywhere.

Everyone’s reaction to Wii friend codes.

Everyone’s reaction to Wii friend codes.

The Miiverse is some kind of bastard child, spawned from the essence of the Nintendo spirit and the fast commotion of Twitter. The whole thing works strangely well, and opens up a snappy line of communication between a large network of Nintendo fans. Getting a reading on others, analyzing their abilities, yelling at each other in celebration or disgust, it’s as if the scouters from DBZ had social networking capabilities.

Hey Vegeta? How many Wii U consoles was Nintendo able to manufacture for launch?

Hey Vegeta! How many Wii U consoles was Nintendo able to manufacture for launch?

...29

…29

...wait, really?

Wait, really?

My interest was peaked from moment one of connecting to the overall network This was out of a complete misunderstanding of the value involved. Much like Nintendo Land, the concept didn’t seem as grand as the execution was. Nintendo is just now really starting to get into the online space, so I felt my accusations of irrelevancy untested. They are a massive company, who should really have their shit together. Even so, I had a feeling akin to screaming at a two year old for not being able to run, as they were learning to walk. Not believing in the capabilities of the young can develop into something demonic, the consequences visibly primal.

Seen here, Gregory Peck as Nintendo’s fan base, Damien; Nintendo’s online service.

Seen here, Gregory Peck as Nintendo’s fan base, Damien; Nintendo’s online service.

As with most potent forms of entertainment, topicality rules the day. I suppose the platform of the Miiverse acts more as an information hub, albeit socially centric. A vast well of self-absorption being traded among similarly minded piers. While everyone is paying due mind to themselves, the reviews process of laughter or applause motivates the outspoken, and leaves idle those without the quality of thought.

No one’s really left out.

Very simply, the spontaneity of the Miiverse is what formalizes it’s power. Need help with a game? Ask the community. Share a cool pic or anecdote, post for all to see. Being able to access the Miiverse without quitting the game is indeed helpful, and makes streamlining the process center stage. I constantly see pleasant exchanges and sentiments, and I imagine the Miiverse to be one where everybody is singing and dancing.

The Miiverse, if hairier.

The Miiverse, if hairier.

There does exist the unforeseen benefits of the application as well. Earlier on there was a technical hiccup that affected the whole service, people were able to post warnings about what to avoid. A meta review community has popped up, further showcasing warnings or dismissing mass negativity about certain titles (see defenders of ZombiU). Last but not least, the impressive array of casual artists that exist. Those that live in the Miiverse, the quiet creative element proudly putting hand to controller on a regular night.

Just one example of what I'm guessing was a quick five minute drawing I saw in the Miiverse.

Just one example of what I’m guessing was a quick five minute drawing I saw in the Miiverse.

Sounds slightly idyllic, right? That’s where my betraying cynicism sets in. The unfortunate truth about the Miiverse, is that’s it’s heavily policed. A knowable but very relentless force of moderators watching the quantitative sub space in which the players exist. The analysis here in makes several parts of me lash out. One part with the intent of reinforcement, another part, biting back as if cornered by an unstoppable destruction.

An artists rendering of a Miiverse Moderator.

An artists rendering of a Miiverse Moderator.

I enjoy the Miiverse because of it’s laid back and friendly nature. This obviously confuses, being well acquainted with the internet. This confuses me on a very basic level, because  on the internet, it’s simply impossible. Not because humans aren’t inherently so, but because these aren’t human beings as we know them. These are vague visages and regulated resemblances of what once was, and what might be again. Sages that have preceded me have indeed prophesied this happening, others, becoming it entirely.

By day, a mild mannered 13 year old middle school boy. By night, an internet user with the handle gaydix99, and “her” insatiable lust for human aggravation.

By day, a mild mannered 13 year old middle school boy. By night, an internet user with the handle gaydix99, and “her” insatiable lust for human aggravation.

So, the division in me seeks not a compromise of tolerance, in turn acting as a  crushing stalemate of resolution. I wonder if this policed state in the Miiverse carries out a proper intent, or if it breaks the very foundations of what makes the internet free and great. On one hand, everyone’s interaction has a controlled sense of emptiness too it, making me desire a larger depth of self-identity. Yet, I’ve seen a much larger female turn out on the Wii U service, maybe due in part to women not having to fear endless harassment or assaults based on physical differences. Cons and Pros making easy work of the landscape.

Still…there exists this hollow truth that has been banished from existence within these virtual walls.

Part of me loves this feeling of togetherness, and another part resents the reason why.

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